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Posts Tagged ‘Torrent’

Image1How does CheckMyTorrentIP work?

CheckMyTorrentIP is a torrent tracker that lets you download a legal torrent file created uniquely for you. Because no one other than you has this torrent and since there are no seeders, the torrent will not download and never complete and will remain active in your queue as long as you wish. You’ll see your torrent IP within your torrent client and you can come back here to see your torrent IP history. I created this site after a friend found it difficult to constantly monitor his setup and kept asking me for help. The site is a free service and there are no gimmicks, just pay it forward.

But I’m using a VPN or Proxy, isn’t my privacy 100% safe guarded?

Maybe, maybe not. This FAQ details many ways your IP address can leak and explain what steps you can take to prevent it. By checking your torrent IP address over a period of time, you can verify if there are any holes in your security practices. If you’re not a techie, have a friend help diagnose your connection.

Why can’t I just use a web browser or other program to check my IP?

See the next question that gives examples where a web browser fails to help you. Also keep in mind that you can’t manually check your IP with a browser 24×7 and your torrent client may be setup to use a different IP address.

How can my IP address be exposed if I’m using a VPN or Proxy?

There are many ways, here are some different scenarios, feel free to send in any others you know about and suggestions.

VPNs – There are many types of VPNs, the two most prevalent types are PPTP and OpenVPN. While each has their advantages and drawbacks, all suffer from the same weakness, at one point or another the connection will drop and this may expose your personal IP address (Note: VPNs enjoy dropping while you’re tucked in bed catching up on ZZZzzzs). To completely prevent exposing your IP address you’ll need to modify your routes or use a firewall program to do this for you. See below in another question for more details on securing a VPN.

Proxies – Again there are many variations but the most popular by far is a socks proxy. The proxy can be a remote host or exist locally via an ssh tunnel. If your proxy is incorrectly configured or unknowingly unset you may expose your IP address. Also always be sure to disable DHT, uTP, udp trakers, udp peers, and UPnP in your client otherwise you will mostly likely leak your IP address even if your proxy is configured correctly. Please see below in another question for more details on securing your proxy and DHT/UPnP.

Firewall – Some users use a software or hardware firewall to route torrent traffic through a secure connection and other traffic (like web) through the local connection. The configuration can be incorrect or become undone.

Relative or Friend – You may have the most secure setup but all it takes is a lovely relative or friend to misunderstand/forget your clear simple instructions and expose your IP address.

Torrent client software bug – There are plenty of torrent clients, and new ones coming out all the time, some are specialized or experimental, others tout better performance. As long as you stick to established mature software, this shouldn’t affect you. But for the bold and daring, make sure to always test the proxy/forwarding/hider feature.

Being an exit node on private P2P – There is a new wave of public/private P2P networks (not Tor) that anonymize your traffic in return for you anonymizing other user’s traffic. There have been and currently exists bugs that incorrectly route your traffic to the point of making you the exit node of your own traffic!

Unknowingly using employer’s VPN – Some computers have multiple VPN configurations installed and you could inadvertently be using the wrong VPN.

By monitoring your torrent IP address, you can definitely improve your setup and curb poor habits.

Check your torrent IP here

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copyright-surveillance-2

From The Electronic Frontier Foundation

It’s been a long time coming, but the copyright surveillance machine known as the Copyright Alert System (CAS) — aka “Six Strikes” — has finally launched. CAS is an agreement between major media corporations and large Internet Service Providers to monitor peer-to-peer networks for copyright infringement and target subscribers who are alleged to infringe — via everything from “educational” alerts to throttling Internet speeds. Unfortunately, the Center for Copyright Information, which is running this “educational” program, is hardly a neutral information source. So, as the participants finally begin to reveal some details, we’re here to provide an alternative.

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From Lifehacker

If you’re using BitTorrent without taking special measures to hide your activity, it’s just a matter of time before your ISP throttles your connection, sends you an ominous letter, or worst case, your ISP gets a subpoena from a lawyer asking for your identity for a file-sharing law suit. Here’s how to set up a simple proxy to keep your torrenting safe and anonymous.

We’ve talked about how to boost your BitTorrent privacy before, but those measures aren’t quite enough anymore to keep you anonymous, because copyright holders are getting more vigilant at tracking down people who share their content.

Heck, you don’t even need to be doing anything illegal, either. Maybe you just want to keep Big Brother out of your business and from throttling your connection. Either way, if you really want to keep your activity private, your best bet involves routing your BitTorrent connection through an external service.

BTGuard is a dead simple BT-focused proxy server and encryption service, and it’s my service of choice. Below, I’ll explain what it does, how it works, and how to set it up to privatize and anonymous your BT traffic.

Read the full article here

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PeerBlock

PeerBlock lets you control who your computer “talks to” on the Internet.

By selecting appropriate lists of “known bad” computers, you can block communication with advertising or spyware oriented servers, computers monitoring your p2p activities, computers which have been “hacked”, even entire countries!

They can’t get in to your computer, and your computer won’t try to send them anything either.

Download PeerBlock from their website.

 

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