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Posts Tagged ‘Free speech’

From the Internet to the iPod, technologies are transforming our society and empowering us as speakers, citizens, creators, and consumers. When our freedoms in the networked world come under attack, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the first line of defense.

EFF broke new ground when it was founded in 1990 — well before the Internet was on most people’s radar — and continues to confront cutting-edge issues defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights today. From the beginning, EFF has championed the public interest in every critical battle affecting digital rights.

Blending the expertise of lawyers, policy analysts, activists, and technologists, EFF achieves significant victories on behalf of consumers and the general public. EFF fights for freedom primarily in the courts, bringing and defending lawsuits even when that means taking on the US government or large corporations. By mobilizing more than 61,000 concerned citizens through our Action Center, EFF beats back bad legislation. In addition to advising policymakers, EFF educates the press and public.

EFF is a donor-funded nonprofit and depends on your support to continue successfully defending your digital rights. Litigation is particularly expensive; because two-thirds of our budget comes from individual donors, every contribution is critical to helping EFF fight — and win — more cases.

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Taken from the ActivistSecurity Collective website:

“Welcome to the website of the ActivistSecurity Collective. The purpose of is to provide a home for some of our publications on practical security for activists and campaigners, all of which are free to download – see below.

We’ve put a lot of time into the Activist Security Handbook – it is now a whooping 70 pages of tightly written text – and we hope it will be of use to every kind of campaigner. Small parts are specific to the United Kingdom but the majority of it will be suitable to people working all over the world.

It has been written by UK activists who have successfully campaigned for over a decade in the face of increasing repression from the state and corporations. However, we need your feedback and your corrections. If we have missed something out or have gotten it wrong, then it is vital you let us know at info@activistsecurity.org. This is intended as a resource for the entire social justice/anti-capitalist/environmental/animal rights collective movement, so it needs your imput as well. We are also willing to do talks in the UK and abroad if needed.

Publications

1) The Security Handbook – practical security advice for campaigns and activists with updated article on mobile phone security.

2) Infiltrators, Informers and Grasses – a guide on what to do if you suspect you may have an insider in your group, practical advice on detecting them and best practise on what to do once you have confirmation.

3) A Guide to Secure Meetings in Pubs – a short and to-the-point guide to meeting in pubs and other public spaces.

For those who speak french there is a good online guide to secuity for activists at guide.boum.org. If you know of any more do let us know.

We are generally happy for activists and campaigners to reprint any of this material as long as they are not profiting from it. However, we would be grateful if you dropped us an email to let us know.

Infiltrators

The ActivistSecurity.org collective has created a blog at network23.org/infiltrators with the aim of creating a repository documenting the infiltrators placed in various movements by the police and private security firms. We aim to provide an authoritive source which people can come to in order to bypass the rumour and disinformation that often accompany exposes.

Where an allegation is brought to our attention we will investigate as far as possible and if we agree we will give our collective’s endorsement to the expose. Follow links for our statements on Becki Todd / Vericola Ltd and Lynn Watson.

Computer Security

We do not specialise in this area. However, if you want to learn more, two useful sites are Tech Tools for Activists and Security @ ngo-in-a-box

NB: Security23 and The ActivistSecurity collective are completely seperate projects and are in no way affiliated with each other.

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